Rates of prevalent and new HIV diagnoses by race and ethnicity among men who have sex with men, U.S. states, 2013–2014
Rosenberg E,Purcell D,Grey J,Hankin-Wei A,Hall E,Sullivan P

Rates of prevalent and new HIV diagnoses by race and ethnicity among men who have sex with men, U.S. states, 2013–2014

Annals of Epidemiology | April 2018

Purpose: Men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of new and existing HIV infections in the United States, with black and Hispanic MSM facing the highest rates. A lack of data on MSM population sizes has precluded the understanding of state-level variations in these rates.

Methods: Using a recently developed model for estimating state-level population sizes of MSM by race that synthesizes data from the American Community Survey and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, in conjunction with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–based HIV diagnosis data, we estimated rates of living with an HIV diagnosis (2013) and new diagnosis among MSM (2014) by state and race.

Results: Nationally, state-level median prevalence of living with an HIV diagnosis was 10.6%. White MSM had lower prevalence in all but five states; black MSM were higher in all but three. Hispanic MSM had highest concentrations in Northeast and Mississippi Delta states. Patterns were similar for new diagnoses rates.

Conclusions: Results suggest that racial disparities in HIV infection among MSM are more prominent than geographic ones. Interventions should be differentially tailored to areas of high proportionate and absolute burden. Continued efforts to understand and address racial differences in HIV infection are needed.

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